Analysis and insight into trends
in money and banking, and their impact
on the world's leading economies

"Inflation: The next threat?"

 An IIMR/IEA report by Juan Castaneda and Tim Congdon, IIMR and the University of Buckingham, on the 18th of June. You can register your interest for this event here.

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IIMR Webinar Series, Summer 2020

The IIMR Money Webinar Series summer term 2020 starts on 15th July with Professor Geoffrey Wood speaking on 'Debts, deficits, central banks and inflation. What insights can history provide for central banks hit by large rises in government debt?' This is then followed by Lars Christensen, Marcel Magnus and Diego Zuluaga, with more being added.

The leaflet is available here.

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19th May 2020

'Banks, Climate Risk and Financial Stability - Online Seminar

María J. Nieto, Bank of Spain

Seminar slides are available here.

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12th May 2020

The 'Quantity Theory' - Online Seminar

Professor Pedro Schwartz, Camilo José Cela University.

Lecture slides are available here.

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2020 IIMR Summer Session (Cancelled)

 

 

Due to the current corona virus situation, the IIMR sadly announces the cancellation of the IIMR 2020 summer session. We will, all being well, reschedule in 2021.

Following the success of our 2019 Summer Session, the Institute is delighted to announce that we will be holding a similar event on 24th-26th June at the Vinson Centre in the University of Buckingham. Details of the programme can be found here.

 

 

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The Monetary Policy Essay Prize 2020

 

 

17th January 2020

 

 

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“Is monetary policy exhausted? Is it possible that the state cannot create extra money balances? In your answer discuss in detail the methods by which the state – understood to include both the government and the central ank – can create new money balances and the implications for the economy of those different methods.”

 

 

Entries should be no longer than 2,500 words long.

 

 

All entries to the competition should be submitted by 11.59pm on Friday 17th January 2020.

 

 

The winning entry will receive a prize of £1,000. There is also a second prize of £300 and a third prize of £200.

 

 

If you wish to enter, visit the IEA website.